Newspaper Refuses To Give An Artist Credit For Her Work

In this piece by Alison Gerber for HYPERALLERGIC, she exposes how the largest Minnesota newspaper failed to mention the artist Christine Baeumler’s name in a story about her artwork. Then, Gerber writes, "they doubled down, insisting that it was an omission, not an error. It’s part of a larger pattern of writing women out of their own work." Read on for an excerpt, or read the full story on HYPERALLERGIC.

 Christine Baeumler, Amanda Lovelee, and Julie Benda, “Pollinator Skyrise” (2017), (photo by Christine Baeumler for Hyperallergic)  Reposted with permission from the author.

Christine Baeumler, Amanda Lovelee, and Julie Benda, “Pollinator Skyrise” (2017), (photo by Christine Baeumler for Hyperallergic) Reposted with permission from the author.

....It wasn’t the first time a woman was written out of her own story, and even that week it wasn’t the last. God help you if you’re a Black or trans woman in the arts, because erasure is intersectional. In recent weeks, national attention has been drawn to the remarkable neglect of Nigerian-American writer Nnendi Okorafor’s authorship in reporting on the forthcoming HBO series based on her novel Who Fears Death, an effacement especially visible in media outlets’ marketing of their own stories. The A.V. Club promoted their story about an “Afrocentric new sci-fi series from producer George R.R. Martin” with a photo of Martin; the Hollywood Reporter led with a headline that didn’t mention Okorafor, along with a photo of another white male writer attached to the project. Most egregiously, back in July, Vice promoted their story with a photo of George R.R. Martin paired with a photo of the jacket of Okorafor’s novel — with her name on the cover cropped out of the photo. Responses on Twitter (especially from women of color) were aghast at the one-two punch of erasure based on sex and race that still packs a wallop in American media....

READ THE FULL STORY AT HYPERALLERGIC.